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A confidentiality agreement (NDA) can be considered unilateral, bilateral or multilateral: a multilateral NDA consists of three or more parties when at least one of the parties expects it to disclose information to the other parties and requires that the information be protected from further disclosure. This type of NDA makes separate unilateral or bilateral NDAs between only two parties redundant. For example, a single multi-party NDA, concluded by three parties each intending to provide information to the other two parties, could be used instead of three separate bilateral NDAs between the first and second parts, the second and third parts, the third and third parts. The main trust agreement states that the receiving party can only communicate the information to third parties who have signed their own agreement with you. For example, as soon as your product hits the shelves, your invention is obviously no longer a secret and so there is no need for privacy from your developer. If this is the case, you indicate in your agreement that the obligation of confidentiality expires after 1 year or 3 years or after the introduction of the product. As it happens, the legal world still sees some of the same mistakes in these types of legal agreements used to protect confidential information. It makes my job a little easier here. A confidentiality agreement can protect any type of information that is not known to everyone. However, confidentiality agreements may also contain clauses protecting the person receiving the information, so that if they have lawfully obtained the information through other sources, they would not be required to keep the information secret. [5] In other words, the confidentiality agreement generally requires that the party receiving information remain confidential when that information has been provided directly by the disclosed party.

However, sometimes it is easier to get a receiving party to sign a simple agreement, which is shorter, less complex, and does not contain security rules to protect the recipient. [Citation required] Another common case when it comes to confidentiality agreements is not providing a reasonable timeframe for the duration of professional secrecy. In these cases, your agreement should stipulate that the beneficiary party will be kept confidential for life. In all likelihood, your receiving party will work with a number of other parties or suppliers, and these people must also be associated with your agreement. . . .